Summary: A cerermonial or ritual Aboriginal engraving site below the Waratah Track, with a decorated man and woman, whale and many fish.

An interesting site on a spur below the Waratah Track, this Aboriginal engraving site was described as a ritual or ceremonial site.

“The exclusive use of fish in close proximity to Coal and Candle Creek, a deep salt-water stream, the association of the man in ceremonial decoration, indicates a ritual significance for this group; it might be connected with fishing magic to ensure a good catch or with increase ceremonies; on the other hand the man and woman may be legendary figures not associated with other figures or associated with them in a myth”

Fred McCarthy

The lifesize man and woman are very distinctive; the man is decorated with parallel and arched lines “in the pattern painted on the body during ceremonies”. Within the woman are some several large, natural punctures.

On an adjoining rock further along the spur is a whale, and above the whale one of many fish (a “breamlike fish”).

Inside the whale is a figure, which was described as a fish.

To the north of the whale are there more large fish (one of this covered by vegetation) and a shark ray or wobbegong shark (also covered).

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Aboriginal Sites by National Park

There are over 350 Aboriginal engraving and sites recorded in the Central Coast region, many of these in the Brisbane Water National Park.
There are about 300 recorded Aboriginal heritage sites in Wollemi National Park, with the rugged and remote environment meaning many sites are yet to be "discovered" and recorde.
Many sites Aboriginal engraving sites across the inner suburbs of Sydney have been destroyed or are very weatheredl. The sites which remain are isolated from their natural environment.
Yengo National Park was an important spiritual and cultural place for the Darkinjung and Wonnarua People for thousands of years, and 640 Aboriginal cultural sites are recorded in the park and nearby areas.
Located to the north-west of Sydney, just south of the Dharug and Yengo National Parks, Maroota has a high concentration of (known) Aboriginal sites. Many more Aboriginal heritage sites are located in the Marramarra National Park. The original inhabitants of the area were the Darug people.
Over a hundred Aboriginal sites have been recorded in the Hornsby region, with many of these in the Berowra Valley National Park and around the suburb of Berowra.