Summary: A series of Aboriginal engraving sites along a ridge of rock extending from the Waratah Track across West Head Road,

Fred MCarthy documented a series of Aboriginal engraving sites along a ridge of rock which extends for about 400m, which he collectively referred to as the “Arden Trig Station” group. Some of these had earlier been documented by W.D. Campbell, who (according to McCarthy) “recorded what he apparently selected as the most interesting figures at this site, and ignored the remainder”.

Site sketch of Arden Trig Aboriginal engravings
Man and Wife Pair of Men Echidnas Wallaby Shield and Boomerang Man Fish Axe Grinding Grooves

Man and Wife

AWAT5558 LR highlighted Arden Trig Station engravings

standing next to each other: the man is 6' tall with a sword club across his waist while the woman is 4' tall.

Pair of Men

AWAT5824 highlighted Arden Trig Station engravings

Two men, described as a "pair of unusual figures". Both are wearing girdles, one has arm-bands and the penis on both figures is pointing upwards

Echidnas

AWAT1798 LR Arden Trig Station engravings

A pair of male and female echidnas in file.

Wallaby

AWAT5569 LR Arden Trig Station engravings

A leaping wallaby in the middle of the platform, which is very weathered.

Shield and Boomerang

IMG 4612 LR Arden Trig Station engravings

A clearly defined shield with line design and dotted decoration all over its surface, and a (returning) boomerang.

Man

AWAT5835 LR highlighted Arden Trig Station engravings

A man in an "active pose"

Fish

AWAT5849 LR Arden Trig Station engravings

Bream-like fish (above man)

Axe Grinding Grooves

AWAT5827 LR Arden Trig Station engravings

Six parallel axe grinding grooves

Series 2 (Fig 8B) – Club and AGGs

A small site in the middle of a long rcck platform, which has six axe grinding grooves (AGGs) next to a waterhole. Nearby are engravings of a club, the posterior part of an echidna and the tail end of a fish.

AWAT5827 LR Arden Trig Station engravings

Series 3 (Fig 8C) – Man and Fish

A group of figures representing a man with fish which are his totem (or which he hopes to catch). In this group there are a total of five fish (some hidden under leaf litter) as well as the man, an incomplete figure and and indeterminate elongate figure.

Series 5 (Fig 8E) – Men

Two men, described as a “pair of unusual figures”. Both are wearing girdles, one has arm-bands and the penis on both figures is pointing upwards

AWAT5824 highlighted Arden Trig Station engravings

Series 6 (Fig 8F) – Man and Wife

A man and wife standing next to each other: the man is 6′ tall with a sword club across his waist while the woman is 4′ tall.

AWAT5558 LR highlighted Arden Trig Station engravings

Series 8 (Fig 8H) – Echidnas and Roo

A pair of male and female echidnas in file. Near the echidnas is a very weathered wallaby or kangaroo.

AWAT1798 LR Arden Trig Station engravings

Series 10 (Fig 8J) – Shield and Boomerang

A clearly defined shield with line design and dotted decoration all over its surface, and a (returning) boomerang.

Arden Trig Station engravings - Site Summary

Aboriginal Sites by National Park

There are over 350 Aboriginal engraving and sites recorded in the Central Coast region, many of these in the Brisbane Water National Park.
Located to the north-west of Sydney, just south of the Dharug and Yengo National Parks, Maroota has a high concentration of (known) Aboriginal sites. Many more Aboriginal heritage sites are located in the Marramarra National Park. The original inhabitants of the area were the Darug people.
A review of different techniques for photographing Aboriginal rock art. This includdes oblique flash, chain and planar mosaic imaging which combines hundreds of overlapping photos.
Over a hundred Aboriginal sites have been recorded in the Hornsby region, with many of these in the Berowra Valley National Park and around the suburb of Berowra.
Many sites Aboriginal engraving sites across the inner suburbs of Sydney have been destroyed or are very weatheredl. The sites which remain are isolated from their natural environment.
Yengo National Park was an important spiritual and cultural place for the Darkinjung and Wonnarua People for thousands of years, and 640 Aboriginal cultural sites are recorded in the park and nearby areas.
Over 40 sites have been recorded within the park; many were located along the river bank and were flooded by the building of the weir in 1938.
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