Described as an "animal scene", the 15 engravings on a rock platform along the Myall Trail in Mt Ku-ring-gai includes a number of wallabies and kangaroos

A large engraving site has fifteen animals scattered over a single large rock platform. The “scene” represents a flock of kangaroos (as well as some other animals), some leaping away in different directions.

Myall Trail Animal Scene
Flat Headed Kangarooo Two Kangaroos Kangaroo Sword club Small kangaroo Curious Kangaroo Wombat Leaping male kangaroo

Flat Headed Kangarooo

AWAT6243 LR Myall Trail - Animal Scene

A flat-headed kangaroo, carved on a steep rock surface. It has "2 conical ears, pointed chin and its head is bent forward on a broad neck; it has a humped shoulder and straight back, it's arm (almost touching the chin) is straight, then bends up and down again to a hand bearing 4 conical fingers".

Two Kangaroos

AWAT6259 LR Myall Trail - Animal Scene

Pair of kangaroos

Kangaroo

AWAT6433 LR Myall Trail - Animal Scene

A leaping kangaroo at the eastern end of the rock platform - a "well shaped animal with its body parallel to the ground in a leap, but not animated".

Sword club

AWAT6530 LR Myall Trail - Animal Scene

A sword club (or boomerang) and kidney-shaped figure.

Small kangaroo

AWAT6546 LR Myall Trail - Animal Scene

A small and weathered kangaroo is next to what has been described as both a bird and a container.

Curious Kangaroo

AWAT6436 LR Myall Trail - Animal Scene

A "curious kangaroo or wallaby lacking both tail and hing limb" - which may also be a koala, but it's head is pointed and flat-faced like a kangaroo.

Wombat

AWAT6535 LR Myall Trail - Animal Scene

Wombat or native cat

Leaping male kangaroo

montage2 stitch LR Myall Trail - Animal Scene

A "magnificent leaping male kangaroo or wallaby over 8 feet long with unusually well proportioned anterior portion including the neck and head".

The figures (from left to right below) recorded by McCarthy include a pair of kangaroos (2 & 3).

montage1 stitch LR 1 Myall Trail - Animal Scene

Next to the pair of kangaroos is a sword club (or boomerang) and kidney-shaped figure (4 & 5).

AWAT6530 LR Myall Trail - Animal Scene

A small and weathered kangaroo is next to what has been described as both a bird and a container or basket (6 & 7).

AWAT6546 LR Myall Trail - Animal Scene
20200613084300 img 0933 lr Myall Trail - Animal Scene

A “curious kangaroo or wallaby lacking both tail and hing limb” – which may also be a koala, but it’s head is pointed and flat-faced like a kangaroo (10).

AWAT6436 LR Myall Trail - Animal Scene

One of the larger kangaroos (11) is at the bottom of the rock platform – a “magnificent leaping male kangaroo or wallaby over 8 feet long with unusually well proportioned anterior portion including the neck and head”.

montage2 stitch LR Myall Trail - Animal Scene

Another leaping kangaroo (12) is at the eastern end of the rock platform – a “well shaped animal with its body parallel to the ground in a leap, but not animated”.

awat8749 lr Myall Trail - Animal Scene
awat8890 lr 1 Myall Trail - Animal Scene

Below the leaping kangaroo is a wombat or native cat (13).

AWAT6535 LR Myall Trail - Animal Scene

Located a short distance away, McCarthy described a flat-headed kangaroo as part of the “Animal Scene” (Mankind Group 76 Series 2). It’s carved on a steep rock surface, and has “2 conical ears, pointed chin and its head is bent forward on a broad neck; it has a humped shoulder and straight back, it’s arm (almost touching the chin) is straight, then bends up and down again to a hand bearing 4 conical fingers”.

AWAT6244 LR Myall Trail - Animal SceneAWAT6244 LR highlighted Myall Trail - Animal Scene

Indigenous sites by National Park

Over 40 sites have been recorded within the park; many were located along the river bank and were flooded by the building of the weir in 1938.
Many sites Aboriginal engraving sites across the inner suburbs of Sydney have been destroyed or are very weatheredl. The sites which remain are isolated from their natural environment.
Located to the north-west of Sydney, just south of the Dharug and Yengo National Parks. Maroota has a high concentration of (known) Aboriginal sites. The original inhabitants of the Maroota area were the Darug people.
Yengo National Park was an important spiritual and cultural place for the Darkinjung and Wonnarua People for thousands of years, and 640 Aboriginal cultural sites are recorded in the park and nearby areas.
There are over 350 Aboriginal engraving and sites recorded in the Central Coast region, many of these in the Brisbane Water National Park.
Over a hundred Aboriginal sites have been recorded in the Hornsby region, with many of these in the Berowra Valley National Park and around the suburb of Berowra.

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