Summary: The Corroborree Cave has five men drawn in red ochre, depicted as if dancing in a corroborree.

Unlike the nearby Boomerang Headed Men Cave, the Corroborree Cave is smaller, and much better protected from the elements.

AWAT0275 LR Corroborree Cave

The shelter is named after a series of five men, painted in red ochre, which were described as being “in dancing corroborree attitude”. They are somewhat weathered, although most of the outlines of the men can still be recognised.

AWAT0269 LR Corroborree CaveAWAT0269 LR lre Corroborree Cave

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Aboriginal Sites by National Park

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